wordpress com stats plugin

Against All Odds

6 במאי, 2012 מאת גילי ומירב

Against All Odds

A baby’s triumph over a deadly cancer

Gil&Merav Shavtieli

Translation: Naama Bianco

This is a first draft of a translation of a synopsis, the first pages and the epilogue of the book, Against All Odds, which was written and published by us in Israel. We are honored to present it to you with the hope that you will be interested in helping us spread our story by publishing our book.

With thanks,

Gil and Merav Shavtieli

Against All Odds A baby’s triumph over a deadly cancer Synopsis

Against All Odds” tells the true story of two young parents, Merav and Gili, whose baby girl is born with a malignant tumor detected in her liver. After she receives chemotherapy at the tender age of nine days, the parents realize that their daughter will not survive any continuation of the same treatment and decide to halt the procedure.

Desperately seeking out alternative approaches that might save their daughter’s life, Gili and Merav encounter opposition from the medical establishment, as well as the disap­proval of various family members. Lacking support, without any prior medical know­ledge or experience, they determine that they are on their own to do the right thing as they see fit.

While they endure the antagonism of the powers-that-be and work to get past their obstructions, Gili and Merav come across an array of fascinating characters who willingly help them: a one-legged taxi driver, a Norwegian healer, a devoutly religious pharmacist, to name a few… and then, most importantly, they meet an Orthodox Jew named Moshe Rogosnitzki who serves double-duty as medical advisor and guardian angel.

Against All Odds” is a riveting story which is told in two voices, sharing different perspectives – that of the mother, Merav, and of the father, Gili. They describe how again and again, in the course of conducting a life-and-death struggle to save their daughter, they swing to and fro between hope and despair; the reader feels compelled to go along for the ride which takes place in Israel and in the United States.

Gili and Merav dared take on the professional communities of pediatricians, medical experts, and the social services in Israel. In the end, against all odds, they were successful.

This is an inspiring eye opening story that encourages each and every one of us to assume responsibility for our own lives and interests.

If you are interested in knowing more about this book or want to help us publish it, please contact us: shavtieli@gmail.com

Gil Shavtieli: (+972)52-878-5757 Merav Shavtieli: (+972)52-727-1098

WWW.GILIMERAV.COM

Taking Responsibility

A few months ago I visited some colleagues I work with at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA. They asked me to meet an interesting patient. He was a highly intelligent and successful businessman, suffering from renal cell carcinoma. He had thoroughly researched his disease and all the treatment options available. He had visited with all the top experts in the U.S.A. He had been told by each one, “you know more about this cancer than I do”.

What then do you want from me, I asked?

What I want is for you to refer me to a doctor who knows more than me, who can tell me which treatment I should pursue.

I said to him. I want to ask you a question. You have seen all the top experts in the USA. They all admit that you know more than they do. Why don’t you take responsibility for your situation and make the decision yourself?

To this he smiled sadly and said, “oh, how difficult it is to take that responsibility”.

Taking responsibility – that is the key.

Through no fault of their own, doctors are unable to know everything. They suffer from a disease which has been created by the great support which the world has given to the advancement of biomedial science. It is known as “Information Overload Syndrome”. Overworked doctors read on average one new medical research article each day or six articles a week. That is a fraction of a percent of the 40,000 new studies published each week.

Many patients don’t realize that it is impossible for a doctor to know everything. They believe that a doctor, like G-d, must know everything. Some doctors believe this too.

Yet those patients who realize that the doctor doesn’t know best, that they have information that the doctor has not seen, why would they continue with the same treatment program? Why wouldn’t they explore other options, and look take advice from other physicians? That has always perplexed me. The kidney-cancer patient in Baltimore answered that question for me. “Oh, how difficult it is to take responsibility.”

When Gili first called me and asked for my assistance in finding different treatment options for his daughter, I was very wary of accepting the task. I knew that if they opted to pursue a different treatment than chemotherapy, there was certain to be a custody battle over her. But Gili and Merav were persistent and tenacious. I quickly realized that nothing would stop them. And so it was.

Merav and Gil thoroughly debated the different treatment options which I researched for them. And then Merav and Gil did what so many of us find it difficult to do. They took responsibility.

The critical moment, when we recognize the limits of human ability, dawn on us every so often. As you will read later in this book, it arrived for Merav and Gili too. Outside the operating room where the baby was being operated on, they prayed. However, it was prayer with a difference. Gili and Merav could say to G-d, we truly did all that was humanly possible, now please do what only you can.

Moshe Rogosnitzky

Chapter 1: Pregnancy



When we returned from our honeymoon I discovered that I was pregnant. I felt very feminine; I enjoyed the transformations my body was undergoing and I took on all moods with love. I stopped smoking and drinking coffee; I relaxed, and I felt healthy. I tried to come to terms with all the fears that welled up inside me.

I was very excited and looked forward to my daughter's entry into the world. For me she was a young angel about to arrive here, through me, and I wanted to help her. The first touch between me and my baby, my first moment of nursing, her first sounds, what she would feel when she'll come into this world, and who would be there to greet her, were very important to me. I wanted her to have a perfect welcome into this world.

Giving birth at home seemed to me to be the best possible experience of all. I wanted a natural birth, in a nice atmosphere that would be intimate and supportive. I chose a home-birthing midwife who owned a private clinic, and I prepared to give birth.

I debated whether or not I should take my little baby to the hospital for a check-up after birth or if it would be better to order a private doctor. For the first time in our lives we investigated the question of vaccinations, and we became exposed to different aspects and options of birthing and raising children. We began to feel that we want to raise our children in a very different way than the generally accepted way we grew up with.

‚

One morning I woke up and found Merav crying. She said she was bleeding. We immediately went to the hospital. After having an ultrasound the doctor told Merav that she had had twins, but she miscarried one of them. Later a doctor, who was more of a specialist, came and another ultrasound was done. He said it was all nonsense, that the fetus had just moved, and all was O.K. We were very happy to hear the fetus's heartbeat that day, and to see the little movements in Merav's belly.

A few weeks later we went for another ultrasound, this time at Dr. Ivry, director of a maternity ward in a hospital in the south. He said everything was fine, and he determined that it was a girl – "98%".

We went to meet Dr. Ivry once a month, at Tipat Halav, for an ongoing surveillance. When he would check Merav he would answer telephone calls. With one hand he would hold the scanner above Merav’s stomach, and with the other he would hold the telephone. The last meeting with him was when Merav was in her ninth month. He felt her stomach and said: “The fetus settled nicely in the stomach, with the head facing downwards. Everything is already ready for the birth.”

Merav worried a little that something would go wrong, but I thought that those were natural fears, that pass through the head of every pregnant woman. We had a basic belief that everything would be ok. We told ourselves that even if we were told that the child would be born autistic, we would still birth it and raise it. We decided to believe in life, we believed that no one can know what will be, anyway. Still, in order to calm those little fears, we started to undergo private monitoring at Dr. Ron Shuali, a birthing doctor, manager of a big hospital in Jerusalem.



I did not calm down, despite all the checkups. Something still worried for the health of our baby, and the medical monitoring did not give a real answer to my questions. The checkups were carried out in an alien place by distant people who were just doing their job, and the answers I got were automated according to the book. My belief in a home birth grew stronger.

‚

As the expected birth date approached we allowed ourselves to do things we had not dared to do before. We rented an expensive and well furnished house with a yard. The yard had a patch of grass, and we imagined our baby taking her first steps on it. We knew that the birth was an opportunity for us to grow new roots. I set an appointment with a newspaper publisher to promote my work in Eilat.

Chapter 2: Turnover

‚

After a few ultrasounds and check-ups, the midwife requested that we do one final ultrasound to know the position of the fetus and its weight. We went to see Dr. Shuali in his clinic. It was our fourth or fifth visit with him. He checked Merav and announced that the baby was breeched, with the buttocks facing downwards and not up upwards. He added that there might be no choice but to have a caesarian section. We responded with absolute horror. 'What can we do?' we asked. He said that they could only try to turn the baby around in the hospital, but it is more than likely going to end in an immediate caesarian section. After that visit we tried everything we could to convince the baby to turn over.



I talked to her. I asked her to turn over, I practiced yoga exercises. During the exercises I felt that my baby had a reason to stay in the position that she was in. Still, we tried everything we could: homeopathy, muxut sticks, acupuncture, and guided imagination. We started looking for a midwife or doctor that would help us give birth naturally with the baby's current position. One doctor, considered a specialist in home-births, claimed that such a birth could only be done for the second pregnancy and after. Finally, we followed the midwife's recommendation and made an appointment with Hezi Cantor, a specialist at turning fetuses around at the Sharon Hospital. He explained over the phone that the dangers of a caesarian section as a result of the treatment are rare, and that by massaging the stomach, the chances are good that she will turn over, "We should do it soon, even today!", he said in an urgent tone of voice.

‚

That day my brother had stayed at our place, but he had already started his way back to the center. I called him and asked him to come back. We packed a small bag and headed out to that hospital. The way was long; Merav with her tumultuous, big belly sat in the back seat of my brother's old Renault, along with a washing machine we had put in earlier to transfer to Yoav, a friend of ours in Tel Aviv.

We had hurriedly left the house we had only managed to sleep in for five nights. On the road we try to get an urgent referral to the hospital from Dr. Ivry over the phone. He answers us roughly and hangs up the phone. However, we refuse to stop or to turn around and go back to get the referral in the traditional way. We have no time to spare. We discovered the breech rather late, in the thirty seventh week. This is the latest week that a fetus can be turned around in a hospital. With or without the referral we are on our way to Dr. Cantor to turn over the fetus.



We reached the hospital in the late evening and immediately met the doctor. Hezi Cantor says that we need to do an ultrasound before the turnover. He starts the check-up and then becomes quiet. There was too long a silence. Suddenly he starts to talk: "I can't turn your baby over. She has a lump. There is a huge lump in her right chest, and it's pressing on the heart." He pressured me to check into a hospital here and now, before morning. "Tomorrow I would transfer you to another hospital in the area, which is well known for its NICO (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit). I'll personally make sure they make room for you in the ward," He promises us. During the next few hours he sits with us and tries to explain us why we will better check-in now, and how rare it is to get a spot in their ward.

What's going on here? I try to cry to relieve some of the stress and worry, but it doesn't work. We ask a lot of questions, and eventually we start to understand all the little details. Now I start to ache, and my eyes start to water.

‚

Hezi pressures Merav to check into a hospital immediately. I try to convince her to spend the night at my parents' house, calm down, and think about what to do next. Hezi insists that it is too risky and dangerous. He continues to scare Merav until she finally gives in to him.



The question mark in front of us keeps getting bigger and bigger. What to do?

Dr. Cantor's words keep returning and echoing: caesarian section, operation on the baby, a huge lump in the right chest, checking- in to a premature-baby ward… He keeps pressuring and advising to check-in at once to "the most wanted NICU in the country".

The middle of the night. We call our parents to get support. Everything will be ok. We have to take the baby out, and God will take care of us; life will watch out for us. We need to function. Yes, yes, taking out my baby.

We check in. There is all-night monitoring. "It's not 100%, it doesn't look right. You have to stay connected until the morning." I'm so uncomfortable. My huge stomach is pressing on me, and I want to change positions. I really try to believe that there is a good reason for this ridiculous position and this monitoring. I pray for the good and to the angels.

Monday 2.12

Early the next morning I am supposed to get checked again and I am sent to the ultrasound floor. I wait for my turn. Gili buys me a cola, and I sit there, leaning my head up against him and feeling like life is about to change.

The results of this test change the whole picture. The doctor became agitated. There was a mistake – the lump is in the liver. The doctor translates what he sees, and finishes with: "If that is what I think, then there is not much of a chance at all that the baby will survive at all after birth." What he thinks exactly, he didn't state. He says that during the morning I would be sent to a different hospital to be checked again and to get another opinion from other specialists.

We are on our way to the new hospital; in an ambulance! I wonder how I changed over-night from a happy, pregnant woman to a frightened woman with a fetus in a scary situation.

‚

The ambulance reaches the hospital. I push Merav along in a wheelchair to the maternity ward on the first floor. The nurse wants to insert an IV, but we insist that we shouldn't insert liquids into the vein without a need; especially if it is not sure that the birth will be today. That upset the nurse, and she demonstratively puts the bag and needle down on the counter.

We are sent for more ultrasounds. A lot of different doctors, professors, nurses, and specialists are pressed into the testing room. I look for a place to sit, or even to stand, but they pretend that we are not even there. For half an hour they scan Merav's belly and talk between themselves in jargon and technical terms, it looks like they are checking an animal and not a human being.

They finish, and I ask if I can be present during the birth. The request doesn't please them. "We'll see." Someone said.



The doctors I meet for the test look very alert. They're calling each other, and a discussion evolves around my exposed belly. They look at the screen and talk between themselves. I try to talk to them and they don't respond.

Finally we find a doctor who is willing to talk to us, and he say that at this point they don't have answers. They just know that they have to take the fetus out and operate her immediately. I am really scared now, terrified of my baby's fate.

‚

It looks like one of the doctors, a young man in jeans and a T-shirt, whom everyone calls by his personal name – Dr. Noah, and who looks like a caring man, and has the respect of all the nurses. I try to talk to him. "It will help Merav a lot," I say, "If I'll be there with her during the surgery; she'll be much calmer."

"I'm not promising anything, but I'll see what I can do." Dr. Noah answered.

After the ultrasound we return to the emergency room on the first floor, and the nurse is already waiting with the liquids bag she had opened and put aside earlier. "I hope it is still good," she says, "because, either way, I'm not opening a new one." Merav is laid down on a portable bed, her shoes are removed, and she is taken out. I walk out after her, and after me – family members who gathered to wait for the surgery.

Since morning the doctors have been hinting that the surgery will take place at this hospital, and not the one next to it, which specializes in children. "Here," I'm promised, "it is less strict, and you have a better chance to be at the birth of your daughter." We are so happy to hear that it was finally decided that the operation would indeed take place in this hospital, and not at all think about the consequences: the mother will be operated in a separate hospital, and the baby will be taken to other hospital.

Another matter that we did not think of had rather special significance: the cola that I had brought Merav will take away from her the possibility of general anesthesia. Thanks to that drink they can't make her drift off to sleep. She will be there when our daughter will be born.



I agree to the caesarian section and I'm sent to the operating room, to prepare for the procedure. I'm terrified. I feel the lump grow and grow. The words "there is not much of a chance that the baby will survive after birth" are well etched into my mind. I just want to meet her already and help her.

We ask a lot of questions, and now we are advancing with the procedures – who will operate, how it will be run, will Gili be with me. We're talking with the appointed surgeon. He is called just Noah. He promises to do everything he can to let both of us into the operating room. I'm shaved, poked with needles, undressed, and hooked up to a catheter. Everyone around me is under pressure. It is clear to everybody that this is not a usual surgery.

The neon lights are bright, and the nurses and the doctors are impatient. They look very scared. Our baby is about to be born and the atmosphere is just so not right.

‚

We wait with the bed outside the operating room. The nurses arrive and behind them the anesthesiologist and he informs us: "I'm in charge of this operation, and there is no chance that I will allow you to be present during the birth."

"But Merav needs me there." I try to convince him. "It will help her to relax. Beside the point, it's my basic right to participate in my daughter's birth.

"The father is allowed to be in the operating room only in caesarian sections done in the morning," responds a nurse, "and the hour is now three in the afternoon."

"Then we'll wait till tomorrow and we'll do it in the morning." I say.

Merav's mother pulls me aside. "Stop it," she says. "Let them do what they want, otherwise they'll take revenge on her later."

I'm frightened and give in. I tell Merav that I love her and that I am with her. The bed is pulled in, and the door closes. I'm left outside. I don't know where they took her, and what is happening to her. I'm scared of losing her. Dr. Noah arrives, I look him in the eyes and he looks down and says: "I did what I could."



From the door of the operating room nobody escorts me. Gili begs to get in, but the policy makes him surrender. "Everything will be ok," I tell him. "We have to take our baby out. I'll manage alone, it's ok."

They move me quickly, almost at a run. The medical crew looks very stressed out to me, almost like my belly is about to blow up in their faces in a moment. They talk to each other in short sentences, ignoring me. I'm transported in such a mechanical way in a stretcher. I am being taken to the birth of my dreams in a terrible fear. Fear is the keyword of how things are from now until the awakening.

Chapter 3: Birth

‚

I sit cross-legged on the floor and close my eyes. Merav's mother tells me to do guided imagination, like I have been doing for the last few hours. "Merav will feel it," she says. I imagine that a sphere of love comes out of me, wraps around Merav, and protects her.

My mother disappeared in the mean time. My father went to bring some food. My brother comes to tell me that it is hard for my mother to see me like this, and she left. I make a call to cancel a meeting with Eilat's local newspaper publisher. I explain that the reason why I will not be arriving today is because my wife is giving birth this moment. "Mazal Tov," he tells me, "Mazal Tov." I'm so excited that someone blesses and congratulates me on the birth. I had imagined to myself that I would be surrounded with friends, who have come to congratulate me on my becoming a father; I hand out cigars that I received just for this occasion to my friends and the rest of the congratulators.

The cigars, along with the rest of the things, were left in Eilat.



The operating room is sterile and metallic. I'm transferred to the cold operating table. I'm naked, covered only by a thin apron. The huge lights above me amaze me, how much light they give. I hope that they really will help the surgeons to see better.

Noah, young and caring, is a caesarian section specialist. There are many people around, and they begin the procedures. There is no general anesthesia, and I am about to experience what is about to happen; only a screen blocks the view of my belly.

I fold into fetal position, I get an epidural injection in my back, and then I start not to feel my legs, first one, and then the other. The anesthesiologist tells me some jokes, and everything becomes blurry.

They cut my belly.

Time passes. I vaguely feel them working with my body, and am shocked to discover the operation reflected in a fog in the lights above me. I see the opening and the blood, and I start to imagine that the surgeon has hands of light that are doing everything right.

Some time passes, somebody backs away, and I hear the sound of a crying baby. I start to cry. Somebody brings a bundle to my face. "Mazal Tov, you have a daughter." The most beautiful creature in the world was revealed before me, looking straight into my eyes. One second passes and she is taken to other districts, disappears, kidnapped.

"My beauty, soul, my sweetie!" I shout and cry. The medical crew is confused, and the surgeon explains to his colleagues, in English, that I wanted to give birth at home, and that's why I am crying. Luckily "I don't understand" English nor Hebrew, luckily I am not even there, otherwise maybe I would have been hurt by their ignorance of me and the referral to me in third person.

‚

After forever, which was darker than black, a doctor comes out of the room with a cart. I chase after her. She stops, turns around to me, and with a cold Russian stare tells me she is in a great hurry.

"That’s my daughter! Stop!" I call after her.

In the cart lies the most beautiful baby in the whole world. Big black eyes look at me with curiosity. She looks just like Merav when she was a baby. Merav's mother sits on the floor, beside the cart, crying and wailing in hysteria. I kiss my baby and call her my love. The doctor reminds us that she is in a hurry. My brother and I walk with her all the way to the NICU.

The babies are on their backs, crying and screaming. The doctor places my baby in the room, and starts to chat with the nurses. After a few minutes she moves the baby into the incubator. She says that my brother can't be in the room. I stay. I worry that she'll disappear or that someone will switch her with another baby, but my brother says to me that there is no other baby that looks like her. I look at her again and again I see her eyes. Big black eyes look into me with a peacefulness of a different place, so far away. Again the doctor chats with the nurses. I ask for help to lift my baby into my arms. "What's the problem? It's like picking up a baby." She answers without even a glance.

I take her into my arms and hug her. The feeling is so nice and natural. I discover that even if I had never held a baby, and certainly not one not even a day old, now, with my baby in my arms, I know exactly what to do.

Suddenly the doctor remembers again that she is in a hurry and returns the baby into the incubator. For some reason it doesn't work. She consults with a male nurse, but to no avail. "We didn't charge it," he concludes.

I don't believe it. They explained that this is an emergency, that they will apparently have to operate immediately after birth, and suddenly the incubator doesn't work. "It's not so bad," says the doctor, and asks the male nurse to take the malfunctioning incubator and my baby in it to the children's hospital in the building next door.

My brother is back at my side, and we help to transport the incubator. The doctor walks beside us, making sure to keep her distance. "I don't want to break my fingernail," she explains. I use the opportunity to touch my baby, to caress her. We pass through elevators and hallways, go outside, and walk between the buildings until we reach the children's hospital.

We go up an elevator and arrive at the NICU. A very tall doctor comes towards us and takes the baby with the incubator. "Now you can leave and let us do our work," he says to me.

"Fine," I say, "but there are three things which are very important to me: don't feed her with any substitutes, but rather wait until the mother has milk to give, don't give her vaccinations and don't take any blood."

He sends me a distant glance. "As it is we don't feed babies within their first twelve hours after birth," he says, "but regarding the vaccinations, you have to have a very good reason for that request, because I can't just not vaccinate her."

"I read Dr. Rozental's book 'Vaccinations – all you need to know and nobody dared to tell you'", I say, "and I am not interested in giving a baby, in her state, a vaccination that has in it a chimpanzee's protein".

He looks at me with disgust and takes my baby into the room without another word.

I tell my brother to stay and look after my baby, and I make my way back to the operating room in the next door hospital, to Merav.



My consciousness returns to my brain before my body could move. Beside me are two women in a similar state; they begin to sob and shout "Ow, ow!" and I understand that it must be painful to be after a caesarian section. I wonder if and when my legs will be able to move. I feel like I'm in a cloud and I understand that apparently only part of my brain is working at the moment. The room I am in is right next to the operating room from which I had just shortly come out of; opposite me are a counter and a nurse who is busy with telephones. From time to time I hear a male voice over the intercom behind her – husbands who are worrying about their wives inside. The nurse answers them shortly and I anticipate hearing Gili's warm voice that will melt the silence. When I finally recognize his voice on the intercom he sounds very worried. I want to answer him or tell the nurse to tell him that everything is ok, that I am soon coming, but I don't succeed in talking; my mouth doesn't work. I manage only to think hard. I give up and continue to rest, missing him. "Only another few minutes," I think to myself.

‚

At the entrance to the waiting room I see that a bed with a woman with a gray and painful face is brought out. I think it's Merav and I start to cry, but a glance at Merav's mother tells me that it is not her. Again I buzz the intercom and somebody finally answers and asks me what I want. "It's Merav's husband, I want to know how she's doing."

"She's ok, she's still waking up, she'll soon be out," answers the voice from behind the wall. Again the door opens and another mother comes out.

Finally Merav is taken out. She looks very fuzzy. "We have a wonderful baby," I tell her. I don't know if she hears me, but I finally manage to relax a bit. She is transported to the recovery room and I follow. I discover that someone stole Merav's new shoes while she was in surgery.

Chapter 4: NICU, Maternity ward



After the surgery I'm moved to a private recovery room. I'm laid down on the bed and they change my catheter. Somebody in a blue wash cap comes to bath me and demands that Gili leaves the room, "for modesty reasons", she says. The room is for our own personal use for a few hours before the hospitalization, I'm the only "recoveree" in it, and I can start to get all my senses back. Immediately guests enter the room. I feel like it is too early.

‚

Family members start to arrive at the recovery room. Most have mourning faces. Merav's grandmother arrives, along with an aunt I barely know, with her two little kids. These are not the people I had imagined would come and congratulate us on our daughter's birth. Overnight Merav is hospitalized in the maternity ward. A few other visitors arrive; Gal, a friend of mine, is the only visitor who brings flowers, and congratulates "Mazal Tov."

The visiting hours are finally over, and the guard hurries to make everyone leave. Merav is suffering from a huge pain and is tired of all the visitors, who sometimes look like they arrived at a picnic. I sit lost and exhausted beside Merav's bed. "Visiting hours are over. She needs to rest." the nurse informs me.

"For years my wife and I have been sleeping together," I try to protest, "We're always together, so why now of all times – when she needs me here, nearby, even to get to the bathroom – will I leave her in a foreign place like this?"

"There is nothing to do. Those are the rules." Explains the nurse, without even looking at me.

Merav says she'll manage. She asks me to go to see our baby and then to my brother's house to sleep, so that I will have strength for tomorrow.

Something inside me just wants so much to go to sleep, to disappear. Yesterday morning we had left Eilat – light-years away from this very dark place I suddenly found myself in – and since then I have not rested nor slept. I have no choice but to obey the nurse and my wife. I kiss Merav, leave her the cell-phone, and go to the children's hospital.

Now I am suddenly all alone.



The move to the maternity ward with the other women reminds me of the hard situation I am in; the other women are getting their babies. Only I don't get mine. My baby was taken away from me, to the children's hospital, in another building. I go into weird euphoria mixed with feelings of mourning.

The hormones, the epidural, the disorientation and the generously amounts of pain relievers, take me to another place; I don't grasp what's happening, I just feel full of pain and hurt.

‚

Our baby lays in the NICU in the incubator with a bandage over her eyes. "She has jaundice," explain the nurses, "Her bilirubin is high, and we are taking care of her with a light therapy" I try to touch her, talk to her, but I feel like I can't do a thing. I leave the NICU and catch a cab to my brother's house. I sit in the living room and start to cry. So much pain has to get out. "You don't see that everyone is trying to help you," my brother starts to defend; "Everyone is here for you, trying to help you." I want to have somebody with me in the hardest moments of my life, but everyone ignores me, disappears, or attacks and judges me.

In bed I can't stop thinking about Merav and our little baby. I imagine that my hands move like her little ones. I really feel like I'm her. I do not allow myself to go to the bathroom or lay on my stomach. Something tells me that I shouldn't indulge myself like that, when Merav painfully lays in the maternity ward, unable to move without help. In the morning I don't want to wake up, to get up and meet the reality. I also can't continue to sleep; I can't get away from my responsibility for Merav and our little baby.

Tuesday 3.12



It's a day after the surgery and I can't stand up, I can't move. My room-mate is humming to her baby, hugging her baby, and I also really want to.

Gili runs between the two hospitals, from building to building, from her to me. He tells me that our baby is wonderful, but he keeps out a lot of detail, and his face looks broken. I sleep and sleep. My body is neutralized and my brain has run off to the clouds. I don't care anymore. Whatever will be, will be; I'll get over it. It's a spiritual journey. My brain tells me wholesome words; my reality is broken. I am disconnecting from the pain, surrounded by apathy.

Family, people, passes by. I don't want to talk. They should go to the other hospital. Whoever can should touch her, be beside her. We send to her everybody who comes to visit. It is clear to us who has what job: our mothers are sent to touch her all the time, to pet her head; Gili's mother was asked to sing to her songs; Oz, Gili's brother, was sent to find out what the doctors are doing and to try to delay them as much as he can. Gili goes to and fro from her to me, comforting me and telling me that he says to her all the time "Daddy is here, Mommy loves you and is going to be here soon" all the time. He tells me that he demands that the nurses in the NICU don't feed the baby sugars or substitutes, but rather wait for the mother's milk.

I loved the baby when she was still in my belly; I waited for her so much.

The course of events has made me grieve, give up, and sink. I'm diving deep into the apathy.

‚

I tell Merav that our baby is ok, that she has a little jaundice and is being taken care of with light therapy. Merav's mother says that they most likely will give her antibiotics, and that she won't be able to nurse for 5 to 10 days, but the nurses say that there is no need for antibiotics, and that with the pills she is taking she can nurse, because they don't affect the milk at all. I try to be both with Merav and the baby, running between the two buildings, asking my mother to stay in the hall the whole time, as to not take an eye off my baby. My brother's wife is always with Merav.

The jaundice keeps getting worse and worse. The doctors say that for now she is fine, but if the jaundice gets worse, then it could damage her brain, and there will be no choice but to replace all of her blood.

Dr. Erez, another doctor from the new generation, wearing jeans under his coat, comes into the NICU. He tries to put a needle into her vain for blood test, and she cries. "Do something!" Erez yells at the nurses and kicks me out of the room. Through the door window I see a nurse put her finger in my baby's mouth to quiet her down, and Dr. Erez succeeds in attaching IVs to her arms and her forehead.

I call Amir. For many years he was our therapist and teacher for guided imagination. A few weeks ago we had met with him and Dafna, his wife, and their three children. We had lunch together in their tiny apartment, and then we went to the kibbutz's pool. We discussed natural births for a long time. I delayed this conversation again and again. It is so hard for me to call him and tell him how all our dreams crashed and fell to pieces. "It's a pity that you didn't call us immediately," He says, "That’s what friends are for." Amir is shocked. He sounds angry. "You have to be with your baby. That is the best thing for her now." It looks like he doesn't quite understand where I stand.

I go out to the lobby of the hospital. There they are lighting the fourth candle of Hanukka. "Do you believe in miracles?!" yells an actor from a comic series on the TV to the children there, "Do you really believe in miracles?! Miracles can happen!!" he promises the hospital's children and parents. I close my eyes and pray to God that he will give me that miracle, that my baby will be healthy, now!

Night fell, and the nurses push me out, both from the children's hospital and the adults hospital. I catch a cab again to my brother's house.

The driver sees that I am broken. He tries to make me tell him why, and finally I tell him that my daughter is about to die of jaundice any second now. "Nonsense!" the driver says, "a lot of babies have jaundice. My two nephews had jaundice when they were born. And today… today they are both athletes. Don't worry," he adds, "this is the best hospital in the Middle East. The doctors here know exactly what they're doing." He finishes in a relaxing tone. As soon as I reach the bed a deep sleep befalls me and I sleep until the middle of the morning the next day, closed inside myself, closed from the rest of the world.

Chapter 5: Nursing



My mother is telling someone a sentence that in a miraculous way wakes me up, returns my consciousness: "Look how she looks! She has to meet the girl."

I'm ready, and within minutes I'm sitting in a wheelchair. Before the meeting with our daughter I want to prepare for her a pumped breast milk.

‚

I get to Merav's bed. She's already dressed and ready to go, saying that she has to meet our daughter and nurse her. I don't know how to prepare her for what she is about to see.

We ask to see the nursing adviser to help us to pump the milk. Into the room enters a meaty and solemn woman; "you can't pump milk forty eight hours after the surgery, you can only after five days; it is a pity to waste your time." She says. We don't give up. I drive Merav to the baby room of the hospital in order to pump milk. It turns out that the pump is being washed, and we have no choice but to wait for an hour. I demand that a social worker, which the nursing brother who had helped me to move the incubator had recommended on, would be called. After a few minutes a nice and sympathetic woman showed up, and when she hears our story her eyes water. She demands that another nursing adviser be called, and that another pump shall be brought.

The adviser arrives with the pump parts, and says: "It's not a problem, just pump half an hour on each side." A couple seconds later Merav screams. The cumbersome machine leaves on her breast a red and frightening blister. I yell over to the social worker and blame the uncertain nursing adviser. A doctor checks the blister and concludes that we need to rub an antibiotic cream on it, and that that breast should not nurse for a few days.

"Come," Merav say to me, "we're going to our daughter." I push her along in her wheelchair, and we go out to the children's hospital. On the way we meet the male nurse who had helped with the incubator, and he sees Merav whimpering in pain. "You're capable," he says, "You have the strength. The pain is not so bad, and the more you move your body after the surgery the faster you will get better." He opens the elevator using a key, and shortens the way to our daughter considerably. He also tells us that he complained to the management about the nurse that had escorted us to the NICU. We thank him and continue on our way – another half hour to the NICU.



Gili takes me to her – my soul's love in the other building. The way is so long, and I'm in a wheelchair, eager for the meeting. Elevators, passageways, hallways, a road, and more passageways, hallways and elevators – what a tedious way.

‚

My baby:

I have the most wonderful baby in the world.

She has such a good energy.

She's wonderful.

I love her so much.

For me it is a miracle that she is she.

It's a giant gift that she chose me.

My wonderful baby looks at the world from within her incubator with big black eyes.

She doesn't understand why they are always poking her with needles, taking her blood, and making her ache.

She also doesn't understand why they took her out of the belly so early,

And who is Mommy at all, and where is she?

She already met Her father. He gave her a big hug, and escorted her in a big box.

He also touched her on the way every time he could.

But why do they keep injecting her with that thing that makes her so weak?

And why don't they let her eat?

This she doesn't understand yet.

She just remembers that suddenly they opened Mommy's stomach, after Mommy was sad and stressed for a few days and Daddy kept talking to her. Until she suddenly stopped hearing him.

And then they took her with force and got her out

She couldn't breathe. Then they put something in her body that really hurt, and she cried.

And Mommy started to cry. And then they gave her a bit to look at her, and they took her away from there.

Since then she has not met Mommy. And since then they have been poking her with needles, bothering her, and talking not nicely to her.

It is hard for her to understand where is Mommy and what is going on around her.

Then she just falls asleep and tries to rest as much as she can.

And then suddenly Mommy comes. How pretty she is. She is so tired and sad.

She sees that she has a giant bandage on her head. Attached on her forehead is an IV.

Mommy takes her into her arms and sings to her a soft love song.



White, tiny, her eyes covered and her veins connected to tubes and mechanical devices. She looks like she's at peace in a surprising way; perhaps she already got used to all the needles. Maybe she is especially strong. She is moving her perfect hands and feet; she's looking for me.

I touch her and I kiss her again and again.

Her eyes are covered because she is being treated in a light bed. "She is being treated in light therapy because she has high bilirubin, jaundice," they explain to me. I don't see her eyes, but she looks like me, and my heart goes out to her, my love. Every second that my eyes are on her I fall deeper in love with her. Her stomach is huge. A pipe is threaded to her nose. I continue to caress her and sing a song into her angel ears. She is totally alert.

"Look, Gili, she recognizes me. She really waited for me."

Her smell overpowers me. I sing and my head is feverish. What is happening? What are they doing to her? My girl, did it hurt you when they attached you to all this equipment? You came here to live? How will I know what to do for you? What is your problem? God! Do the doctors know what they are doing? How will I know if I can trust them?

I know that babies who nurse immediately don't really come down with jaundice. Space opened up in me, the yearning is too great, I demand to nurse her at once. They offer me a plastic chair. I sit beside the incubator, trying to nurse two days late, and she knows exactly what to do. Wonderful.

I attach to her with love I did not know I have. At that moment my body starts to recover from the surgery.

‚

Merav asks to take the baby and to nurse her. Our baby gives a loving and understanding look into her eyes and strokes the blister on her breast, brings her mouth to it and pops it. Then she starts to breastfeed. Finally something natural, humane, real. A nurse enters and says that the baby has to be returned to the incubator because her life is in danger due to the jaundice. We ask for a few more minutes, and we return her.

It is already late, and Merav is hurt and exhausted, wanting to go back and get some pain medication. I ask from one of the nurses a pump so that we can leave some milk for overnight. It turns out that the hospital does not provide one of the parts for the pump, which can be found at "Yad Sarah" on the fifth floor, but that is open only until five. I decide to try and get the part anyway, and after running back and forth between the buildings three times, each time with the wrong part, it appears that there will be no breast pumping tonight.

While we are still trying to grasp that we cannot leave milk for our baby tonight, a nurse rushes in and notifies that they have to give the baby thrombocytes. We try to understand what she means, and she explains that the talked about is a product of blood. Merav starts to cry, and the nurse tries to comfort her: "don't cry, sweetie, it's not so bad." Suddenly another nurse appears and informs that they checked the blood and that the last check showed an estimated amount four times the amount before, and currently there is no need for blood transfusion. We are sure that the nursing changed the situation, and thanks to that our baby will not force to get anonymous blood donations. We hug each other and calm down a bit. I return Merav to the maternity ward and call my parents, asking them to buy the best breast pump in the market.

Thursday 5.12

Morning, and again I wheel Merav in a wheelchair to the NICU. I'm surprised to discover that the head nurse treated my request seriously, and moved our daughter from the emergency room to a normal NICU. I worried that the intimidating noise and the beeping were bound to hurt her hearing; I also told her that she is not premature, therefore she should not be in the premature baby emergency rooms; and even though the nurse answered that there is not much difference in the level of noise, I find that she finally did us justice and moved her to another room. The feeling here is much better. Fewer babies are crying and screaming, and there is less beeping equipment. A radio is playing news from the outside world, pleasant music. It is definitely a change.

I put in the tape a relaxation music cassette that I had managed to put in the bag during the last moment before leaving Eilat, and I put it right beside the incubator. Maybe that will help calm her down.

The nurses say that the jaundice has gone down. Merav gets ten minutes of nursing time in an intimate room with nursing chairs. There is a feeling that things are starting to work out.

Merav returns her to the incubator. She is very tired, and has to get to the toilet. The restrooms in the NICU are meant for personnel use only, and only outside, beside the elevator, they have a toilet for Handicapped. It is usually occupied and filthy because in additional to the disabled people all the visitors and the parents of the babies in the NICU use it, too. I convince Merav to use the toilets on the NICU: "It's ok, you underwent surgery two days ago, no one is going to say anything." She goes in hesitantly, but one of the doctors sees her and starts to shout that there are toilets outside, that she should go to them.

I return Merav to the maternity ward and go back to the NICU. In the room, beside the incubator, sits an older woman, withdrawn, totally concentrating on checking the NICU's daily sheets. I introduce myself, and she introduces herself: "Professor Leiber, Professor Soroka's replacement, the NICU manager." She charms me with her simplicity and she looks to me free of arrogance.

"For a long time now," I open up before her, "I have looked for someone certified to give me some answers, and I haven’t found that someone. Besides that, I really want to thank the head nurse for moving us to this room." The professor says that she is the one in charge of the room, and now I can calm down.

"I am already much calmer," I tell her, "but I need to ask from you with the strongest request to take from my daughter the least possible amount of blood; I also really ask that they make sure to give my daughter only her mother's milk, and not formulas as long as there is breast milk in the fridge."

Professor Leiber explains that her approach is to poke the babies with needles as little as possible. She takes a red marker and writes in large letters on a note: "only mother's milk."

Finally, somebody humane. My mother talks with her, and it seems that a special connection is immediately formed. I leave them there and go to the hospital to get Merav and bring her to the NICU. Amir and Dafna are there; Dafna arrived in the morning with organic bread that she had baked and a salad she had made, and towards the evening Amir joined her. We really want to be helped by them, but don't know if it is possible.

Chapter 6: On the edge



The doctors don't explain anything. I already start to grasp the idea of the hierarchy. We need to wait for someone who "can" give explanations. The position in which they make us stand is exceptionable. We pass our questions through all the personnel, until the head deputy of the department, Lieber, comes by. Finally, someone who can paint some sort of picture for us: "it is still not very clear what it is in her stomach. All we know is that it is a great threat. She is undergoing tests all the time."

I suddenly understand that while I was mourning, my baby went through and is still going through medical procedures, day and night. I sit opposite the incubator and look at her. I want to stay beside her as much as possible. We notice that all the equipment that she is attached to is portable, and we ask the doctors if we can be with her alone, insisting, pleading.

Gili's mother calls a friend of hers, a wife of a known journalist, who knows one of the doctors, and after half a day of discussions and negotiation we get permission to be with her alone for a few hours in the rest room. The personnel pity us, and they let us be with her for these few hours, maybe the last, in their opinion.

It is hard for me with all the strings and pipes. She is connected in so many different places, but finally we are together, alone. I cherish these moments and I draw energy from them. I wrap her in my arms, protecting her with my body, totally overwhelmed with the emotions that she brings up in me, and ignoring the outside world. But the outside world demands my attention.

Two senior doctors enter the room that was set up for us in the NICU, one of them the director of the oncology department. A surgeon also appears, and when he begins to speak time stops; he says "big malignant tumor in the liver", and everything freezes. It feels like something too big, and in a weird way a smile steals to my lips. Maybe everything just doesn't make sense and that is why it is a bit funny.

How much worse can the situation get?

"It's cancer?" I go into a practical mode and start to inquire.

"Yes," answers the surgeon.

"Ok, so you'll operate?"

The main reason for their visit in the room is now uncovered: "we can't operate. Not enough healthy liver will be left."

The surgeon looks at his colleagues and says: "he'll have to undergo chemotherapy and in the future we will be able to operate." We shut up. The idea sounds really weird. We are shocked at the diagnosis and the proposed solution.

"We need to do a biopsy," the surgeon continued, "in order to authorize what I am already sure – the name of it is hepatoblastoma. He will…"

"She!" I impatiently correct, "you are talking about my daughter."

"Yes, she will have to undergo chemotherapy treatments." He repeats.

They notify us that very soon they will move her to the oncology department. They hand us a form to sign – our permission for the biopsy…

Epilogue/ Moshe Rogosnitzky

In the first couple of years after Gili & Merav’s daughter’s successful treatment, I would get phone-calls every few months from a doctor I was friendly with inquiring about her health.

I remember the first time he asked me, and I was surprised how he knew about my involvement with the case. It transpired that a colleague of his had told him and asked him to find out. This colleague, Dr. Weinger, was head of the pediatric department in the Jerusalem hospital who had opposed surgery for the baby, and had provided an opinion to the Court in support of taking custody of the baby in order to give her more chemotherapy.

Gili and Merav were still living with trepidation that their baby would be taken away from them. The trauma they had experienced left them with a fear that was literally palpable. I recall the phone conversations with Gili where I would unsuccessfully try to convince him that they have nothing to worry about. I told him that after the humiliation the doctors experienced in their case, there was no way they would pick another battle with them. But they remained unconvinced. It took a number of years for them to calm down, and this book is the ultimate confirmation that those fears are behind them.

My response to the doctor’s inquiry each time was that I would have to talk to the parents before answering him. Needless to say, Gili objected to my sharing any information with the doctor, and I respected his wishes. I was convinced though that the doctor really knew the successful outcome.

A couple of years later I was contacted by a family of an infant diagnosed with hepatoblastoma – the identical subtype which Gili and Merav’s baby had had. They had heard about the successful outcome of Gili and Merav’s daughter, and they wanted my help. With the experiences of Gili and Merav’s at the hands of the legal system still fresh in my mind, I did not feel up to another battle. I also did not know that the parents would be as brave as Gili and Merav had been in taking on the system, should the need arise.

I enquired which oncologist was treating the baby and was told that it was Dr. Weinger. I immediately thought of a solution. I told the family that I had experienced a very difficult time with the previous case I had assisted. However, I said, Dr. Weinger knows about my work and knows about the results. If he is willing to extend his cooperation then I am willing to get involved and provide advice.

We all want to believe that justice and common sense prevail at the end. Sadly, ego often prevents this from happening. In this case too there would be no cooperation. And so sadly this case too joined the statistics.

Gili and Merav took on a battle that very few would be brave enough to even dream about. A young couple with no previous medical experience found themselves suddenly thrown in to the deep end. In their battle for doing what they were convinced was correct, they heroically took on the entire pediatric medical community in Israel, as well as the social services. They persevered and against all odds they prevailed.

I often reflect on the cases I meet of people who accept everything their doctors tell them with total faith. Perhaps George Bernard Shaw sums it up most appropriately – “We have not lost faith, but we have transferred it from G-d to the medical profession.”

gidon1

"בריאה" הוא סיפורה מעורר ההשראה של תינוקת שנולדה עם גידול נדיר בכבד. לאחר שטופלה בכימותרפיה כשהייתה בת תשעה ימים, ההורים שלה החליטו להפסיק את הטיפול שהתברר כקטלני וחסר סיכוי ולמצוא טיפול חלופי. במהרה הם מצאו עצמם נרדפים על-ידי הרופאים שפנו לבית-המשפט מתוך דרישה לאשפז בכפייה את התינוקת להמשך הטיפולים הכימותרפיים.

הספר "בריאה", שפרקים ממנו פורסמו ב"מעריב "nrg, כתוב כמעין יומן המסופר בקולותיהם של שני ההורים. העלילה הדוקומנטרית הולכת ונפרשת ותוך כדי כך סוחפת את הקורא לתוך סיפור מתח מורט עצבים שלא נותן מנוח גם לאחר סיום הקריאה.

חדש: ניתן לקבוע מפגשים אישיים עם גילי.

992545_bonding

תגובות אחרונות באתר:

  • גילי ומירב: שלום לכולם! מי שמעוניין יכול לקרוא כעת את 25 הפרקים הראשונים של הספר דרך האתר. בשבילנו זהו עוד שלב במסע שלנו להביא את הסיפור שלנו אל תוך לבכם. פעמים רבות בדרך נתקלנו בחומות ובתהומות אך בכל מקרה היתה זו דרך מספקת ומלמדת ביותר עבורנו. אנחנו מקווים שנזכה להיות עבורכם כמו טיפות המים המעצבות סימנים בסלע. כל אחד ואחת מכם מוזמנים לראות עצמכם כטיפות נוספת החוברת אלינו להפוך ביחד לגל אחד גדול של מודעות. אנחנו מבקשים מכם לעשות מאמץ כדי לא לטבוע בים הפרטים הקטנים אלא לראות את האמת הגדולה המנסה להתגלות מתוכם.כל טוב! גילי
  • פנינה חלף: גילי יקר , שמעתי אותך היום בתכנית הבוקר, . סיפורכם נגע לליבי ,”ישר כח” על הוצאת הספר ,חשוב מאוד שסיפורכם יופץ בכל הערוצים . צדקת שאמרת שהרופאים אינם אלוהים אלא בעלי מקצוע ויש לבדוק,להתייעץ, לקרוא מחקרים הרי לא לשווא נאמר ש “מידע זה כח” מאחלת לך בריאות שלמה ושנים רבות של אושר למשפחתכם פנינה
  • רותם שפע: ת ב ו ר כ ו ! מי ייתן והסיפור שלכם ישמש עוד נדבח להתעוררות הנדרשת לנגד האיוולת המימסדית… חוצמזה בקרוב אני מעלה חנות אינטרנטית אשמח למכור את ספרכם תודה ושנה טובה רותם
  • גילי ומירב: תודה לכולכם! לכל מי שליווה אותנו, לכל מי שקרא והגיב, לכל מי שתמך ופרגן ולכל מי שנתן לסיפור שלנו לגעת בו. הספר מוצע כעת למכירה במהדורת דפוס ערוכה ומסוגננת. ניתן גם לרכוש גרסה דיגיטלית של מהדורת הדפוס תמורת סכום סימלי של 30 ש”ח. אנחנו נמשיך להיות כאן בשביל כל מי שירגיש צורך לפנות אלינו באמצעות המייל או האתר. שתהיה לכולנו שנה טובה ובריאה גילי ומירב
  • שירן: לאחרונה רכשתי את הספר,אני חייבת לציין שחווית הקריאה של הספר הייתה טובה בהרבה מהמעקב השבועי אחרי האתר, מהרגע שקיבלתי אותו לא יכולתי להורידו מידיי, הרגשתי איך אני מלווה אתכם לאורך כל הדרך, כשאני הולכת לאיבוד בין הדפים. תודה לכם על התושייה שעוררתם בי, למדתי בזכותכם שתמיד יש עוד דרך שאפשר ללכת בה ושתמיד הבחירה היא בידיי
  • מרינה: בתגובה של רוני טל לפרק “המשפט” כתוב כי מדובר בפרק אופטימי. מצד אחד, אכן יש בו תפנית חיובית בעלילה. מצד שני, אני חושבת עד כמה הפרק הזה פסימי, שכן המשפט הוא משחק מזל ולו היו נופלים לידיו של שופט אחר, יתכן והיו מאבדים את בתם.
  • גילי ומירב: שלום לכולם. שוב תודה על התגובות החמות. תודה לכל מי שטורח לעקוב ולקרוא. ולכל מי שפנה אלינו דרך האתר או באופן אישי. אנחנו מברכים על התקופה הארוכה בה פרסמנו ב nrg, ועל כל מי שהגיע אלינו בזכות זה. אנחנו מקווים שניתן יהיה לרכוש את הספר החל מחודש ספטמבר דרך האתר ובחנויות.
  • רונן: אני עוקב בהתרגשות אחרי סיפורכם. עד לפני מספר שנים גם אני הייתי בטוח שרופאים הם אלילים, או לפחות קוסמים גאונים. מאז קרו מספר דברים שגרמו לי להבין שהם בעלי מקצוע כמו כל אחד אחד, עם אינטרסים אנושיים, חומריים. גם בלי לדעת את כל הפרטים ובלי לברר באופן אובייקטיבי את הצד השני של התמונה, הסיפור שאתם מציגים מאוד מתאים לנסיון שלי עם רופאים. אני משוכנע שלא כולם רק תאבי יוקרה ובצע, אבל לפחות רובם רחוקים מאוד מהקדושה שכל כך הרבה אנשים נוטים לייחס להם. ברור לי שמעטים, אם בכלל, מייחסים משקל לשבועת הרופא. תודה על פירסום הסיפור. זה מאוד מעודד ומחזק את מי שראה את המערכת מזווית דומה לשלכם וחשב שהוא די לבד במאבקים שלו, כשהסביבה הקרובה לא תומכת, כי לא יכול להיות שיודעים יותר טוב מרופא ולא יכול להיות שיש לרופא כוונה שונה משליחות אלוהית לעזור לכל אדם המגיע אליו. המון תודה על ההשראה. מאחל לכם את כל האושר בעולם, רונן
  • ורד: מחכים כבר לפרק הבא תהיו בריאים תודה על שאתם חולקים את סיפורכם עימנו!
  • מאיה: אני עוקבת כבר זמן רב וקוראת כל מילה, מעריצה ונדהמת מכוחותיכם הנפשיים והפיסיים, מהאומץ להקשיב ללב ולעמוד ממש מול כל העולם.. כואב מאוד לקראו ולקלוט באיזו מציאות רפואית אנו חיים, אבל..הכי מכווץ את הלב לקרוא על הבגידה הנוראית והאכזרית של המשפחה שלכם! אני כל כך שמחה שהצלחתם במאבקכם וזכיתם בילדה בריאה (כבר לא יכולה לחכות לפרקים עם הסוף הטוב :) כמה מזל יש לה לילדה הזו- שנולדה דוקא לכם! אתם מודל להשראה והתחזקות- יישר כוחכם!
  • טל: צריך היה לעשות תכנית תחקיר לערוץ 2 (הנוראי אך אפקטיבי). האנשים האלה עוד עובדים?! לא ייאמן. רק בגלל זה כדאי ללדת בבית, בלי התערבות הממסד.
  • ננה: שלום לכם זוג יקר, אני קוראת את הבלוג שלכם – כול יום בודקת אם יש עידכון חדש ומקווה מאוד לקרוא חדשות טובות. אני הייתי בסרט דומה עם אימי שחלתה בסרטן וההתמודדות עם הממסד הרפואי היה קשה ועלו המון התנגדויות והרבה טיפולים אמא שלי סרבה לעשות. תודה לאל היא עדיין חיה – כבר עברו 6 שנים – הרופאים בהלם. אני חייבת לציין שאמא שלי התנגדה לכימוטרפיה עד שהגיעה למצב שכמעט היתה משותקת והרבה גידולים בגוף – ואז לא היתה לה ברירה ועשתה סידרה די קשה של כימו. במקביל אני בדקתי המון אופציות ברפואה אלטרנטיבית – ואני חייבת להודות שצריך להיות מאוד זהירים – יש גם הרבה שרלטנים בתחום – בכול מקרה בסופו של דבר הבנו שרק שילוב של הדברים עובד – רק אלטרנטיבי לא יכל לעזור לאמא שלי במצבה. אני ממליצה לכם ליצור קשר עם פרופסור זייצ’יק – הוא חוקר סרטן איש מדהים זה האתר שלו: http://www.what-is-cancer.com/ אמא שלי התיעצה איתו הרבה ובזכותו היא לא עשתה השתלת מח עצם – מה שכול הרופאים המליצו – והיא חיה ונושמת :-) ואפשר לדבר איתו בטלפון – ללא תשלום או משהו. מה שעוד אמא שלי מציינת זה שהכי חשוב זה מה חושבים – איזה מחשבות עוברות בראש – אבל לצערי את זה קשה ללמד תינוקת קטנה כזו – למרות שבטח יש לה רק מחשבות טובות היא כל כך קטנה תמימה… בקיצור – אני מחזקת את ידיכם – זכותכם המלאה להחליט מה טוב בשביל הבת שלכם – תחשבו מחשבות חיוביות ואל תתעסקו יותר מידי בענינים של כעס ושינאה – פשוט תמשיכו הלאה – חבל על האנרגיות שלכם גם כן – תנסו לתרגל מדיטציה או דמיו מודרך – להרגיע את נפשותיכם -. יש המון אנשים טובים על הדרך – שולחת לכם המון תמיכה ואהבה – מחכה לבשורות טובות דרך אגב היום ראיתי המלצה על ספר שנשמע טוב “אנטומיה של תקווה” של דר’ ג’רום גרופמן – תקווה זה אלמנט חשוב
  • אחת: התמונה בעמוד הבית היא אמיתית? כי אם כן זה ממש מצמרר… התמונה כאילו מסמלת את החופש של התינוקת מבי”ח וחוזרת לזרועות הוריה אל תוך השקיעה (תמונה שמרמזת מאד על סוף טוב)
  • נגה: הסיפור שלכם מדהים. במיוחד מדהימה אותי היכולת שלכם להגן על בתכם. מהתנסות קצרצרה עם תינוק בבית-חולים ברור לי שהפרוש שאתם נותנים להתנהגות הרופאים הוא נכון. וזה מפחיד מאד.
  • אריאל: אכן לאחר קריאה יותר מעמיקה הבנתי שיש גיל ויש גילי.
  • גילי ומירב: אריאל שלום. התגובה של גיל לא באה מאיתנו. מודים לך על השיתוף ומאחלים לך הרבה בריאות והצלחה.
  • אריאל: סליחה על הבורות, (אריאל מפגין בורות, אך חושב את עצמו לידען בנושא) לא טענתי שאני מומחה למשהוא ו/או ידען. בסך הכל נתתי את מעט הידע שיש לי. את האתר הזה נתתי בתור דוגמה אבל יש הרבה מאוד אתרים בנושא. מעבר לזה למה התגובה המזלזלת במישהו שרוצה לעזור לך. אני כל יום משתמש ב 10 גלעינים של משמיש ואני עדין בחיים. בכל מקרה אני מחל לכם רק טוב ובהצלחה.
  • קוראת אתכם: כל כך קשה. איך אתם מצליחים לראות הכל בראיה כה מפוכחת? איך אתם מצליחים ללכת נגד הממסד? חזקו ואמצו. יש הרבה אנשים אתכם ואתם לא לבד.
  • גילי ומירב: תודה לכל המגיבים. אנחנו רוצים שוב להזכיר שהדברים קרו בעבר. כמו כן אנחנו רוצים להדגיש שהתכנים באתר אינם מהווים המלצה רפואית. אנחנו משתדלים לא לצנזר תגובות, אבל אנחנו לא יכולים לקחת אחריות על התוכן שלהן. אתם מתבקשים להפעיל “קומון סנס” ולהמשיך ללמוד ולחקור בעצמכם את הדברים. אנא היעזרו בקצת סבלנות כדי להגיע לסוף הסיפור ולקבל את התמונה המלאה.
  • אחת: אתם כיום עוסקים באיזשהו תחום ברפואה משלימה? הרי זה וודאי השאיר עליכם חותם רציני
  • גיל: אריאל מפגין בורות, אך חושב את עצמו לידען בנושא . לאטריל (אמיגדלין) אינו ויטמין. אין זה תכשיר חדש, אלא תכשיר ישן שנבדק בעבר ונמצא כי הוא בלתי יעיל בסוגי סרטן שונים ואף רעיל (גרם להרעלת ציאניד). בשל כך החומר אסור לשימוש בארצות הברית. המקור שאריאל מתבסס עליו הוא אתר פרסומי בלתי אמין שבו יש הפנייה לרכישת המוצר ומוצרים דומים. ניתן למצוא מידע ורשימת מקורות אמינים בנושא בוויקיפדיה באנגלית: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A mygdalin . ואם גילי ומירב אינם מצדדים, כטענתם, ברפואה אלטרנטיבית, מדוע הם מפרסמים באתרם פרסומות למוצרים ולמטפלים אלטרנטיביים?
  • אריאל: האם שמעתם על ה B-17 או בשמו מקצועי laetrile. אחוז ההצלחה של החומר הטבעי הזה עומד כיום על כ 85%, לעומת הכימו שעומד על 15%. אבדתי אם ואחות למחלה הארורה הזאת, עוד לפני שידעתי על החומר הנ”ל. היום אני משתמש בו כחומר מנע. החומר מופק מגלעינים של מישמש ועוד כמה פרות. תעשו חיפוש בגוגל. הסיכוי שלכם גדול יותר אם לא תיתנו לעולל את החומר הרעיל הזה שנקרא כימו. עוד דבר, האם ידעתם שיש היום יותר אנשים שמטפלים בסרטן (רופאים אחיות וכדומה) מאשר חולים? דבר אשר מפרנס המון אנשים שלא רוצים לוותר על מומחיותם ו/או פרנסתם. בבקשה תבדקו את הקישור שהוספתי כדי לקבל מושג. http://www.1awesomeb17site.com / כולי תיקווה שכך או אחרת תמצאו מזור ומרפה לביתכם ולא תפסידו אותה בתור שפן ניסיונות לרופאים שמחפשים “מקרים מעניינים” שחושבים שהם שליחו של הקדוש ברוך הוא. אם כל הכבוד ויש כבוד, לכבוד הרב פירר הוא כולו מאמין של הרפואה הקונבנציונלית בלבד.
  • גיל: גילי ומירב גילו אומץ? אומץ אינו לברוח מטיפול קשה וכרוך בתופעות לוואי, אך יחיד שהוכח כיעיל, אל אשליה של “טיפול” מלטף אך בלתי יעיל, אלא להיפך. אומץ הוא להילחם למרות קשיים הכרוכים בכך ולא לברוח מהמלחמה בגלל הסיכון הכרוך בה (בריחה מבית חולים אינה כרוכה בסיכון כלשהו). לרופאים אין לב, אלא רק “קופה רושמת”? אני דווקא קורא שהרופאים ניסו לעזור לגילי ולמירב מעל מה שבעלי מקצוע אחרים היו עושים (הם הפנו את ההורים ליועצים חיצוניים מתחרים, אישרו הגעת מטפלים “טבעיים” ואף תרגמו עבור ההורים בלי תמורה מסמכים – וזאת הרבה מעבר לדרוש לפי חוק זכויות החולה). האם הרבה בעלי מקצוע אחרים היו עושים זאת? האם הרופאים בבית החולים הציבורי הם “קופה רושמת” או דווקא המטפלים שאליהם פנו ההורים? אני יודע שהרופאים ברפואה הציבורית לא מקבלים גמול הולם לעבודתם הקשה, המחייבת אותם להתמודד עם התנהגות של משפחות כמו זו של גילי ומירב (הרופאים לא יכולים לסרב לקבלם לטיפול, בניגוד למטפלים האלטרנטיבים), ואילו המטפלים האלטרנטיבים שמשלים משפחות הנמצאות במצב קשה עושים זאת תוך גריפת ממון רב לכיסיהם.
  • קוראת אתכם: אתם אמיצים כל כך! היו חזקים. רפואה שלמה.
  • תמר: תתפללו אין דרך אחרת!
  • תמר: הרופאים לא יודעים לרפא. כבר שנים שאין להם לב! רק קופה רושמת
  • אחת: וואו כל פרק שאני קוראת זה מדהים יותר ויותר וגם מפחיד!
  • חגית: מרגש עד דמעות, מה מצבה של הילדה היום? מה אוכלת? בת כמה? היא מחייכת? איך מצב הרוח שלכם ביומיום? אתם עובדים?
  • עמוס: גילי ומירב יקרים היומן שלכם מעורר התפעלות על המסירות והנחישות לקחת אחריות על הטיפול בכם ובבתכם ועל כוחות האמונה והאהבה שבכם. גם אני (כמו ד”ר לוי) חושב שלא כל כך חשוב מה באמת עבד בשביל בתכם, העיקר שמצבה השתפר. לדעתי לכל אדם תגובות אינדיבידואליות לטיפולים מסוגים שונים ולכן המחקר, על אף חשיבותו, לא פותר את המקרה של החולה הספציפי הנוכחי אליו יש להתייחס לגופו של עניין, עם אהבה ואכפתיות ולא כעוד מקרה או כמחלה.
  • אייר: מחזקת ידיכם בכל אשר אתם עושים,צריך אומץ גדול ןבעיקר עיניים שרואות ןלב שמרגיש ואת שניהם יש לכם.הטיפול של טרונד הגיע בזמן,איני מכירה אותו אך ברור שהטיפול בכם פתח בפניה אפשרות להחלמה.חיזקו ואימצו אייר
  • אחת: רגע איבדתי אתכם…מי זה משה? ועוד משהו,מי זה ניצן אישתו של ברי? חסר פה הרבה ידע פתאום אני לא מבינה מי השמות החדשים הללו! תודה:)
  • מירב האמא: לאמא של מתמחה:גם אם בסיטואציות אחרות יכלתי לראות את פועלו המבורך של המתמחה בסיפור,בזמן ההוא המוסד הזה כפה עלי טיפול מסוכן והצוות השתדל בכל כוחו לבצע. רציתי שיורידו את הידיים מהתינוקת ויפסיקו את הניסוי כדי שנוכל להתפנות לטיפול נכון עבורה. לצורך איזון: אני לא יודעת מה עוד חוץ מממון ותהילה יגרום למרכז רפואי להעלים מידע על אופציות נוספות ,ימציא מספרים לא אמינים ולא מגובים על אחוזי הצלחה ויתעקש בכוח על המשך טיפולים אגרסיביים לילוד ששוקל שני קילו וקצת. השילוב של נדירות המחלה יחד עם מחקר בנושא שנערך במרכז יכול לעזור להבין שלמרות שמערכותיה של התינוקת קרסו היתה מוטיביציה מוגברת מצד הרופאים להמשיך עוד ועוד.מישהו צריך לעצור ולהגיד הלו! לא על התינוקת הזאת. מצפה לדווח: כתבתי לך באנרגי כבר מספיק. אולי רק אזכיר שנגררנו אל בית החולים הזה בלחץ הפחדות,איומים וכפיה ולא הגענו אליו אחרי שיקולים ומחשבה מתוך בחירה.בהמשך הסיפור ישנם גם מצבים אחרים ומקומות אחרים.
  • אמא של מתמחה: כאמא של מתמחה אני מוחה נמרצות נגד האשממתכם את הרופאים בבתי החולים הציבוריים בהתנשאות ובתאוות ממון ותהילה. בני עובד בפרך בימים ובלילות בתנאים קשים לא מתוך התנשאות ולא מתוך תאוות ממון או תהילה. הוא יכול לישון בתורנות בלילה, אך מעדיף לטפל בחולים הזקוקים לעזרתו. עליו להתמודד עם דרישות חסרות בסיס של חולים ומשפחותיהם והוא מגלה סבלנות רבה כלפיהם. כך עושים כל הרופאים שאני מכירה בבית החולים. חוצפה היא להאשים אותו ואת הרופאים האחרים ברפואה הציבורית(גם הבכירים)בהתנשאו� � ותאוות ממון ותהילה, המתאימים יותר למרפאים ברפואה הפרטית שאליהם פניתם. אכן, אין להתייחס לרופאים כאל כל יכולים, אך אין להתייחס אליהם כפי שאתם התייחסתם.
  • לצורך איזון: בניגוד לרוב המגיבים כאן, אני חושבת שאין אוביקטיביות בסיפורכם, שטענותיכם מבוססות על גישה מראש נגד הרפואה שאיננה טבעית ולא על עובדות מוכחות, ושאתם לא מאפשרים לאלו שאותם אתם מתקיפים להגיב. אתם טוענים שהרופאים התייחסו אליכם בהתנשאות מתוך דאגה לאינטרסים שלהם ושל המוסד בו הם עובדים הקשורים לממון או לתהילה. אני קראתי כי רבים מהרופאים התייחסו אליכם לא בהתנשאות אלא בסבלנות רבה, סייעו לכם והפנו אתכם לחוות דעת נוספות חיצוניות. איך אתם מעיזים להגיד שמתמחים אשר ניסו לטפל בתינוקת שלכם בלילה במקום ללכת לישון עשו זאת מתוך תאוות ממון או תהילה? איזה ממון ואיזו תהילה דרושים למתמחים אלו? ואיזה ממון ואיזו תהילה דרושים לרופאים היותר בכירים? הרי משרתם בטוחה בבית החולים בלי קשר לממון או לתהילה. להיפך- דווקא סיפורכם, שהוא בבחינת פרסומת, קשור לממון ולתהילה שדרושים למרפאים הטבעיים שאליהם פניתם כדי שיוכלו להמשיך לגרוף ממון רב מעיסוקם במסגרת פרטית ולא ציבורית שאינה מתגמלת, אלא דורשת סבלנות אין קץ כלפי מטופלים כמוכם.
  • שמעון: גיל ומירב שלומות! האם ניתן לקבל מספר טלפון להילר שעזר לכם? אשמח באם תיענו לבקשתי זו. בתודה למפרע. שמעון. נ.ב. כל מי שעשה מחקר קצר יודע שרופאים בעיקר לומדים פרמקולוגיה משך שנותיהם בפקולטה לרפואה, אי לכך הדחף של מרביתם לרשום לכולנו תרופות ועוד תרופות. בשנה האחרונה החלפתי 3 רופאי משפחה שסירבו למדוד לי לחץ דם במרפאתם. האם הם פוחדים לגעת בחולה או שאינם יודעים איך מבצעים בדיקה פשוטה זו? לאלוהים הפתרונים!!!
  • גילי ומירב: ליאת שלום. קודם כל תודה על האיחולים והברכות. אנחנו מעולם לא תכננו לפגוש מערכת מנוכרת ורדומה ששמה את טובת החולה אי שם בסוף הרשימה. לו רק יכולנו היינו בוראים לעצמנו רופאים שמסתכלים לאחר בעיניים מאותו הגובה, מכניסים עצמם לנעליו, מתייחסים אליו ואל החלטותיו לפני כל דבר אחר. ברור שהרבה לפני האינטרסים שלהם ושל המוסד בו הם עובדים, הקשורים לרוב לממון או לתהילה. ברמה היותר עמוקה אני מסכים איתך. אנחנו בראנו את המציאות הזו. ועל-כן אם ישנה ביקורת היא לא לאותם רופאים. הביקורת היא אלינו, אל המון החולים, שמתייחסים אל רופאיהם כאל בני מעמד עליון, אם לא כאלים. אם לא נדרוש יחס ראוי לא בטוח שנקבל אותו. לא במוסך, לא בבנק ולא בבתי-החולים. כ”כ הרבה אגודות וארגונים קמו כדי להגן על הצרכן בפני התאגידים ואילו אנחנו מצאנו עצמנו כזוג הורים לתינוקת שנולדה עם גידול בכבד לבד מול מערכת שרמסה שוב ושוב את זכויות האדם שלנו ואת כל זכויות החולה של ביתנו. הלוואי שהייתה שם איזושהי מחשבה חיובית שיכלה להוציא אותנו מהלופ הזה. אנחנו גילינו שהדרך הייתה צריכה להיות עבורנו הרבה יותר מעשית. התחושה הרעה הזו בכל הגוף שאת מתארת. אולי היא לא הייתה מגיעה לו היינו בוחרים לתאר את הדשא והציפורים הנמצאים מחוץ למחלקה. הם טובים וקיימים, אבל הם פחות קשורים לסיפור שלנו. אני לגמרי בעד לראות את הדברים הטובים שקיימים, אבל מה זה אומר לגבי שאר הדברים. להתעלם מהם? ליייפות אותם? להעביר את המסר בצורה שתהיה יותר נעימה? הדברים האלה קרו לנו והצלחנו לשרוד אותם למרות התחושות המאוד קשות שליוו אותנו במשך השבועות האלה שעליהם אנחנו מספרים והזמן שבא אח”כ. מקווה שתתחזקי ותקראי את שאר הטורים. גילי
  • ליאת: גילי ומירב שלום. קראתי את הטורים שלכם והזעזעתי מאוד, אחרי כמה טורים נשברתי, זה עושה לי רע בכל הגוף. ממש פיסית. אני מאחלת לכם בהצלחה במאבק ושולחת לכם ברכות. יש לי גם ביקורת קטנה. אני חולקת אתכם את השקפת העולם שאומרת שרופאים לא באמת מבינים שום דבר. זאת אחרי נסיונות הולכים וחוזרים עם אבחנות מוטעות ורופאים אנטיפתיים. אני לא אלאה אתכם בפרטים, אבל האמון שלי ברופאים לא מאוד גבוה. אבל למדתי על עצמי שההשקפה הזאת עלולה לגרום לי מראש ליצור מציאות שלילית. לאחרונה החלטתי לשנות את זה ולהתחיל לראות רופאים אחרת, אתם ודאי תאמרו שנכנעתי לשיטה. זה לא ממש נכון, אני עדיין עושה הכל כדי לא ללכת לרופאים, אבל גמלתי בליבי החלטה שאני מסתכלת עליהם מעכשיו באור אחר. אני אומרת לכם את זה כי אני מזהה את זה קצת גם אצלכם. בטורים שקראתי הרגשתי לפרקים שאתם בתוך איזה לופ, שלא מאפשר לכם ליצור מציאות אחרת. שאתם כבר יוצרים מציאות שלילית מתוך ההשקפה השלילית שלכם על בתי חולים ורופאים. אני מרגישה שכדאי לכם לעשות סוויץ’, אני בטוחה שהיקום יעזור לכם בכך. חשיבה חיובית גם בתוך בתי החולים, אהבה גם כלפי הרופאים, ואמונה שהאנשים האלה באמת מנסים לעזור לכם. אני מרגישה שכל אלה יוכלו לייצר מציאות הפוכה ממה שאתם מרגישים. כשאני הולכת לרופא אני קודם כל מתכוונת. מדמיינת שהפגישה תהיה טובה, יוצרת התכוונות שהרופא יהיה ידידותי וטוב לב ומבקשת מהיקום שהתהליך יהיה חיובי ותורם. זה בדרך כלל עובד. אני שולחת לכם ברכות והרבה הצלחה ליאת
  • אחת: יש לטרונד אתר אינטרנט במקרה? ד.א. פרק מדהים!! סוף סוף אני מתחילה לקרוא דברים חיוביים!! מאד מרגש!!! מעצבן איך שהרופאים נוטים לזקוף לזכותם דברים שהם לא אמורים!!!
  • שרה: שלום, ראשית, רפואה שלמה ובשורות טובות, שנית, קראתי את ספרה של שרה חמו: שביל הזהב לריפוי טבעי. גם היא התמודדה עם הממסד במלחמה נחרצת. והבריאה ממחלה שהסיכוי להירפא ממנה שואף ל-…..למרות שהרפואה לא הודתה בכך. בהצלחה, ישועת ה’ כהרף עין שרה
  • איריס: התפללו הרבה לעזרה מבורא עולם . חילונית . גאה בכם וקוראת בשקיקה את העובר עליכם .חיזקו ואימצו
  • מיכל: הי גילי ומירב התרגשתי מאוד לקרוא את הפרק! תודה שכתבתם על טרונד. חיבוקים ונשיקות לילדודס מכולנו.
  • גילי ומירב: שלום לכל הקוראים! במהלך השבוע יתפרסם פרק נוסף. אנחנו רואים חשיבות רבה בהבאת סיפורנו לציבור הרחב. אנחנו משתדלים לפרסם את הפרקים תוך סנכרון עם הפרסום ב nrg. עקב כך נוצר מצב בו לפעמים בשבוע מסויים לא מפורסם פרק חדש כדי לשמור על הרצף.
  • sara: שלום, קראתי את 17 הפרקים הראשונים. וכבר זמן רב שלא נוסף פרק חדש באתר. האם יפורסמו עוד פרקים או שהמטרה היא שנקנה את הספר ? (כי הסקרנות רבה מאד) תודה
  • גילי ומירב: שוב תודה לכל המתפללים והמברכים ולכל מי שהציע עזרה. התקופה הזו, שעליה אנחנו כותבים, כבר מזמן מאחורינו. התינוקת שלנו היא כיום ילדה גדולה ובריאה. גילי
  • מירב: מירב וגילי היקרים. במקרה הגעתי הבוקר אל סיפורכם העצוב והמכעיס לא פחות. אני מהופנטת ולא יכולה להפסיק לקרוא ולבכות גם יחד. מחר כשאדליק נרות שבת, אתפלל לשלומה של הילדה היקרה הקטנה ואבקש עבורכם שלווה וכחות נפש לעבור את התקופה הקשה כל כך. מזעזע אותי לקרוא לאיזה יחס משפיל זכיתם, דווקא בתקופה קשה כל כך בה הייתם זקוקים לחיבוק חם וכתף תומכת. הלוואי והיתה לי דרך נוספת לעזור לכם מלבד תפילה אותה אשא בליבי להחלמת בתכם היקרה. חושבת עליכם ורוצה לשמוע בשורות טובות. מירב.
  • לילך: עוקבת ומנסה להציף את כולכם בענני אהבה ובריאות. תמשיכו לעשות את הכי טוב בשביל הילדה שלכם ובשביל עצמכם. לילך
  • לילך: מחזקת אתכם בכל ליבי. שולחת לכם ענני ערמות של אהבה והערכה. ילדתי כמעט איתכם ועקבתי כמעט מההתחלה… אם אפשר לעזור בכל דרך-אשמח
  • קרינה: גילי ומירב אני כמו רותם לאחר כתבה קצרה באתר NRG כל כך נסחפתי להמשיך לקרוא את כל הפרקים אני בהריון בחודש 8 ונורא היתרגשתי מהפרקים אומנם מאוד קשה לעיכול אך מציאותי המחלה לצערי קרובה אלי מאוד (סבא ובן זוג לשעבר שחלה) רציתי להגיד לכם שאתם באמת אנשים מיוחדים והכוחות והיחד שלכם יכול רק ללמד ולהראות שיש סיכוי והאופטימיות זה התרופה הטובה ביותר לחיים אני ממש שמחה לשמוע שכרגע הילדה בסדר והייתי מאוד שמחה לדעת ולקרוא פרקים נוספים במידה ויש
  • גילי ומירב: רותם המון תודה על כל החיזוקים. הפרקים שפורסמו הם פרקים מתוך ספר המספר על מה שעברנו לפני מספר שנים. התינוקת שלנו היא כיום ילדה בריאה ומאושרת. ישנם ילדים אחרים הזקוקים ברגעים אלה לכל התפילות והעזרה. אחת מהן היא סופי אשר מופיע קישור לאתר שלה אצלינו באתר. תוכלי ליצור קשר דרך שם או דרכי אם יהיה בכך צורך. יישר כוח גילי
  • רותם: לגילי ומירב המדהימים, שמי רותם, אני בחורה דתייה, בת 21ואמא לתינוק בן 10 חודשים. הגעתי לאתר שלכם לאחר שקראתי קטע אחד בnrg ופשוט לא יכלתי להפסיק לקרוא, קראתי פרק פרק מההתחלה ועד הסוף!אני מזדהה עם התחושות של הרצון לעשות הכל בשביל הילד שלכם כל כך! לצערי אין לי הרבה במה לעזור לכם (הכסף הוא לא משאב שמצוי אצלנו לרוב) ולכן הדרך היחידה שלי (וחס וחלילה אני לא ממעטת בערכה) היא תפילות עבור סופי. רציתי להגיד לך שמבין השורות של הפרקים השונים, ראיתי זוג מדהים, עם המון המון כוחות, שלמרות הכל (במלוא מובן המשמעות של הכל!!!) ממשיך לתפקד, בחיי הקצרים עברתי לא מעט דברים קשים, וגיליתי שהאמונה וכח הרצון הם לפחות 50% מהדרך אל ההצלחה! אני בטוחה שסופי מקבלת מכם המון כוחות, ומתפללת שבאמת תעברו את זה כמו גדולים! אני לא יודעת איזה עוד עזרה אתם צריכים עוד חוץ מכספית, אולי אם תוכלו לכתוב למייל, או באתר עוד דברים שאתם צריכים בהם עזרה אוכל לנסות לעזור בעצמי או למצוא את הגורמים המתאימים! המון בהצלחה… מתפללת בשבילכם!
  • גילי ומירב: תודה, על התפילות וההבנה ועל הצעת העזרה. תודה לכל מי שמזדהה ומגיב ולכל אלה שנכנסים וקוראים…. התינוקת היא היום ילדה בריאה ומדהימה, אבל לא הייתי רוצה להקדים את המאוחר. גילי
  • מיכל: ליבי איתכם,הורים טריים וכל כך כאובים, אני מתפללת לשלום הקטנה,הלוואי והייתי יכולה לעשות עוד משהו, האם יש משהו שאפשר לעשות למענכם? ומה שלומה היום? הרבה אהבה וחום,מיכל
  • גילי ומירב: מתפלל איתכם ומקווה לטוב. הלוואי ותמשיכו להתחזק ותרגישו קצת פחות חסרי אונים. גילי
  • קרן, אמא לעתיד (מקווה): ליבי איתכם. קוראת ובוכה. אני בהריון שמסתבך מרגע לרגע, הבדיקות לא טובות, בזו אחר זו, אנחנו מתפללים מקווים וחסרי אונים. נתתם לנו כח. תודה.
  • גילי ומירב: תודה! עברנו לפונט אחר. מקווה שזה יותר טוב. גילי
  • אמא אחת: גילי ומירב יקרים, אני עוקבת בדריכות רבה אחר הפרקים שאתם מפרסמים. כל הכבוד על הכתיבה האמיצה והחושפנית. אני מושכנעת שאתם עושים שירות מאד חשוב לכל הורה – הרי כולנו עומדים לא פעם מול רופאים שחצניים…..ממת� �נה בקוצר רוח להמשך הקורות אתכם. ופידבק טכני קטן- הפונט שבחרתם לאתר מקשה על הקריאה. ה”ל” שיורדת מהשורה מאמצת את העיניים. פונט אריאל שהוא המקובל ביותר באינטרנט הוא גם הקריא ביותר. אשמח אם תשקלו לעבור אליו. תודה!
  • עדי: לגילי ומירב קראתי את כל הפרקים בשקיקה. מדהים כמה בעידן חוק זכויות החולה רופאים עדיין מרשים לעצמם לחרוג מהכללים האתיים. אני רואה שאתם יודעים את זכויותיכם, ורוצה לחזק אתכם בעמידה האיתנה על זכותכם וזכותה של בתכם לקבל את הטיפול שאתם רוצים שהיא תקבל. אני מאחלת לכם רפואה שלמה במהירות ושתמשיכו באומץ לב לשתף גם אחרים שיוכלו ללמוד מניסיונכם. שולחת אליכם אנרגיות חיוביות עדי
  • שרון: האם אתם גיל ומירב מיקנעם?
  • דניאל: כל הכבוד לכם, דניאל
  • עדי: מקסים וכל כך כל כך מרגש לא יכולה לחכות לשמוע את הסוף הטוב
  • מיכל: מזעזע. האטימות של הרופאים

נושאים: כללי | עריכה|


22 תגובות

  1. מאת גילי ומירב :

    שלום לכל הקוראים!
    במהלך השבוע יתפרסם פרק נוסף. אנחנו רואים חשיבות רבה בהבאת סיפורנו לציבור הרחב. אנחנו משתדלים לפרסם את הפרקים תוך סנכרון עם הפרסום ב nrg. עקב כך נוצר מצב בו לפעמים בשבוע מסויים לא מפורסם פרק חדש כדי לשמור על הרצף.

  2. מאת שרה :

    שלום,
    ראשית, רפואה שלמה ובשורות טובות,
    שנית, קראתי את ספרה של שרה חמו: שביל הזהב לריפוי טבעי. גם היא התמודדה עם הממסד במלחמה נחרצת. והבריאה ממחלה שהסיכוי להירפא ממנה שואף ל-…..למרות שהרפואה לא הודתה בכך.

    בהצלחה, ישועת ה' כהרף עין
    שרה

  3. מאת ליאת :

    גילי ומירב שלום. קראתי את הטורים שלכם והזעזעתי מאוד, אחרי כמה טורים נשברתי, זה עושה לי רע בכל הגוף. ממש פיסית. אני מאחלת לכם בהצלחה במאבק ושולחת לכם ברכות.
    יש לי גם ביקורת קטנה. אני חולקת אתכם את השקפת העולם שאומרת שרופאים לא באמת מבינים שום דבר. זאת אחרי נסיונות הולכים וחוזרים עם אבחנות מוטעות ורופאים אנטיפתיים. אני לא אלאה אתכם בפרטים, אבל האמון שלי ברופאים לא מאוד גבוה.
    אבל למדתי על עצמי שההשקפה הזאת עלולה לגרום לי מראש ליצור מציאות שלילית. לאחרונה החלטתי לשנות את זה ולהתחיל לראות רופאים אחרת, אתם ודאי תאמרו שנכנעתי לשיטה. זה לא ממש נכון, אני עדיין עושה הכל כדי לא ללכת לרופאים, אבל גמלתי בליבי החלטה שאני מסתכלת עליהם מעכשיו באור אחר.
    אני אומרת לכם את זה כי אני מזהה את זה קצת גם אצלכם. בטורים שקראתי הרגשתי לפרקים שאתם בתוך איזה לופ, שלא מאפשר לכם ליצור מציאות אחרת. שאתם כבר יוצרים מציאות שלילית מתוך ההשקפה השלילית שלכם על בתי חולים ורופאים. אני מרגישה שכדאי לכם לעשות סוויץ', אני בטוחה שהיקום יעזור לכם בכך. חשיבה חיובית גם בתוך בתי החולים, אהבה גם כלפי הרופאים, ואמונה שהאנשים האלה באמת מנסים לעזור לכם. אני מרגישה שכל אלה יוכלו לייצר מציאות הפוכה ממה שאתם מרגישים.
    כשאני הולכת לרופא אני קודם כל מתכוונת. מדמיינת שהפגישה תהיה טובה, יוצרת התכוונות שהרופא יהיה ידידותי וטוב לב ומבקשת מהיקום שהתהליך יהיה חיובי ותורם. זה בדרך כלל עובד.
    אני שולחת לכם ברכות והרבה הצלחה
    ליאת

  4. מאת גילי ומירב :

    ליאת שלום.

    קודם כל תודה על האיחולים והברכות.
    אנחנו מעולם לא תכננו לפגוש מערכת מנוכרת ורדומה ששמה את טובת החולה אי שם בסוף הרשימה. לו רק יכולנו היינו בוראים לעצמנו רופאים שמסתכלים לאחר בעיניים מאותו הגובה, מכניסים עצמם לנעליו, מתייחסים אליו ואל החלטותיו לפני כל דבר אחר. ברור שהרבה לפני האינטרסים שלהם ושל המוסד בו הם עובדים, הקשורים לרוב לממון או לתהילה.
    ברמה היותר עמוקה אני מסכים איתך. אנחנו בראנו את המציאות הזו. ועל-כן אם ישנה ביקורת היא לא לאותם רופאים. הביקורת היא אלינו, אל המון החולים, שמתייחסים אל רופאיהם כאל בני מעמד עליון, אם לא כאלים. אם לא נדרוש יחס ראוי לא בטוח שנקבל אותו. לא במוסך, לא בבנק ולא בבתי-החולים. כ"כ הרבה אגודות וארגונים קמו כדי להגן על הצרכן בפני התאגידים ואילו אנחנו מצאנו עצמנו כזוג הורים לתינוקת שנולדה עם גידול בכבד לבד מול מערכת שרמסה שוב ושוב את זכויות האדם שלנו ואת כל זכויות החולה של ביתנו. הלוואי שהייתה שם איזושהי מחשבה חיובית שיכלה להוציא אותנו מהלופ הזה. אנחנו גילינו שהדרך הייתה צריכה להיות עבורנו הרבה יותר מעשית.
    התחושה הרעה הזו בכל הגוף שאת מתארת. אולי היא לא הייתה מגיעה לו היינו בוחרים לתאר את הדשא והציפורים הנמצאים מחוץ למחלקה. הם טובים וקיימים, אבל הם פחות קשורים לסיפור שלנו.
    אני לגמרי בעד לראות את הדברים הטובים שקיימים, אבל מה זה אומר לגבי שאר הדברים. להתעלם מהם? ליייפות אותם? להעביר את המסר בצורה שתהיה יותר נעימה? הדברים האלה קרו לנו והצלחנו לשרוד אותם למרות התחושות המאוד קשות שליוו אותנו במשך השבועות האלה שעליהם אנחנו מספרים והזמן שבא אח"כ.
    מקווה שתתחזקי ותקראי את שאר הטורים. גילי

  5. מאת שמעון :

    גיל ומירב שלומות!
    האם ניתן לקבל מספר טלפון להילר שעזר לכם? אשמח באם תיענו לבקשתי זו. בתודה למפרע. שמעון.
    נ.ב. כל מי שעשה מחקר קצר יודע שרופאים בעיקר לומדים פרמקולוגיה משך שנותיהם בפקולטה לרפואה, אי לכך הדחף של מרביתם לרשום לכולנו תרופות ועוד תרופות. בשנה האחרונה החלפתי 3 רופאי משפחה שסירבו למדוד לי לחץ דם במרפאתם. האם הם פוחדים לגעת בחולה או שאינם יודעים איך מבצעים בדיקה פשוטה זו? לאלוהים הפתרונים!!!

  6. מאת לצורך איזון :

    בניגוד לרוב המגיבים כאן, אני חושבת שאין אוביקטיביות בסיפורכם, שטענותיכם מבוססות על גישה מראש נגד הרפואה שאיננה טבעית ולא על עובדות מוכחות, ושאתם לא מאפשרים לאלו שאותם אתם מתקיפים להגיב.
    אתם טוענים שהרופאים התייחסו אליכם בהתנשאות מתוך דאגה לאינטרסים שלהם ושל המוסד בו הם עובדים הקשורים לממון או לתהילה.
    אני קראתי כי רבים מהרופאים התייחסו אליכם לא בהתנשאות אלא בסבלנות רבה, סייעו לכם והפנו אתכם לחוות דעת נוספות חיצוניות. איך אתם מעיזים להגיד שמתמחים אשר ניסו לטפל בתינוקת שלכם בלילה במקום ללכת לישון עשו זאת מתוך תאוות ממון או תהילה? איזה ממון ואיזו תהילה דרושים למתמחים אלו? ואיזה ממון ואיזו תהילה דרושים לרופאים היותר בכירים? הרי משרתם בטוחה בבית החולים בלי קשר לממון או לתהילה. להיפך- דווקא סיפורכם, שהוא בבחינת פרסומת, קשור לממון ולתהילה שדרושים למרפאים הטבעיים שאליהם פניתם כדי שיוכלו להמשיך לגרוף ממון רב מעיסוקם במסגרת פרטית ולא ציבורית שאינה מתגמלת, אלא דורשת סבלנות אין קץ כלפי מטופלים כמוכם.

  7. מאת אמא של מתמחה :

    כאמא של מתמחה אני מוחה נמרצות נגד האשממתכם את הרופאים בבתי החולים הציבוריים בהתנשאות ובתאוות ממון ותהילה.
    בני עובד בפרך בימים ובלילות בתנאים קשים לא מתוך התנשאות ולא מתוך תאוות ממון או תהילה. הוא יכול לישון בתורנות בלילה, אך מעדיף לטפל בחולים הזקוקים לעזרתו. עליו להתמודד עם דרישות חסרות בסיס של חולים ומשפחותיהם והוא מגלה סבלנות רבה כלפיהם. כך עושים כל הרופאים שאני מכירה בבית החולים. חוצפה היא להאשים אותו ואת הרופאים האחרים ברפואה הציבורית(גם הבכירים)בהתנשאות ותאוות ממון ותהילה, המתאימים יותר למרפאים ברפואה הפרטית שאליהם פניתם.
    אכן, אין להתייחס לרופאים כאל כל יכולים, אך אין להתייחס אליהם כפי שאתם התייחסתם.

  8. מאת מירב האמא :

    לאמא של מתמחה:גם אם בסיטואציות אחרות יכלתי לראות את פועלו המבורך של המתמחה בסיפור,בזמן ההוא המוסד הזה כפה עלי טיפול מסוכן והצוות השתדל בכל כוחו לבצע.
    רציתי שיורידו את הידיים מהתינוקת ויפסיקו את הניסוי כדי שנוכל להתפנות לטיפול נכון עבורה.
    לצורך איזון: אני לא יודעת מה עוד חוץ מממון ותהילה יגרום למרכז רפואי להעלים מידע על אופציות נוספות ,ימציא מספרים לא אמינים ולא מגובים על אחוזי הצלחה ויתעקש בכוח על המשך טיפולים אגרסיביים לילוד ששוקל שני קילו וקצת.
    השילוב של נדירות המחלה יחד עם מחקר בנושא שנערך במרכז יכול לעזור להבין שלמרות שמערכותיה של התינוקת קרסו היתה מוטיביציה מוגברת מצד הרופאים להמשיך עוד ועוד.מישהו צריך לעצור ולהגיד הלו! לא על התינוקת הזאת.
    מצפה לדווח: כתבתי לך באנרגי כבר מספיק.
    אולי רק אזכיר שנגררנו אל בית החולים הזה בלחץ הפחדות,איומים וכפיה ולא הגענו אליו אחרי שיקולים ומחשבה מתוך בחירה.בהמשך הסיפור ישנם גם מצבים אחרים ומקומות אחרים.

  9. מאת חגית :

    מרגש עד דמעות,
    מה מצבה של הילדה היום? מה אוכלת? בת כמה? היא מחייכת?
    איך מצב הרוח שלכם ביומיום?
    אתם עובדים?

  10. מאת גיל :

    אריאל מפגין בורות, אך חושב את עצמו לידען בנושא . לאטריל (אמיגדלין) אינו ויטמין. אין זה תכשיר חדש, אלא תכשיר ישן שנבדק בעבר ונמצא כי הוא בלתי יעיל בסוגי סרטן שונים ואף רעיל (גרם להרעלת ציאניד). בשל כך החומר אסור לשימוש בארצות הברית.
    המקור שאריאל מתבסס עליו הוא אתר פרסומי בלתי אמין שבו יש הפנייה לרכישת המוצר ומוצרים דומים.
    ניתן למצוא מידע ורשימת מקורות אמינים בנושא בוויקיפדיה באנגלית:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amygdalin .
    ואם גילי ומירב אינם מצדדים, כטענתם, ברפואה אלטרנטיבית, מדוע הם מפרסמים באתרם פרסומות למוצרים ולמטפלים אלטרנטיביים?

  11. מאת גילי ומירב :

    תודה לכל המגיבים. אנחנו רוצים שוב להזכיר שהדברים קרו בעבר. כמו כן אנחנו רוצים להדגיש שהתכנים באתר אינם מהווים המלצה רפואית. אנחנו משתדלים לא לצנזר תגובות, אבל אנחנו לא יכולים לקחת אחריות על התוכן שלהן. אתם מתבקשים להפעיל "קומון סנס" ולהמשיך ללמוד ולחקור בעצמכם את הדברים. אנא היעזרו בקצת סבלנות כדי להגיע לסוף הסיפור ולקבל את התמונה המלאה.

  12. מאת אריאל :

    סליחה על הבורות, (אריאל מפגין בורות, אך חושב את עצמו לידען בנושא) לא טענתי שאני מומחה למשהוא ו/או ידען. בסך הכל נתתי את מעט הידע שיש לי. את האתר הזה נתתי בתור דוגמה אבל יש הרבה מאוד אתרים בנושא. מעבר לזה למה התגובה המזלזלת במישהו שרוצה לעזור לך.
    אני כל יום משתמש ב 10 גלעינים של משמיש ואני עדין בחיים. בכל מקרה אני מחל לכם רק טוב ובהצלחה.

  13. מאת גילי ומירב :

    אריאל שלום.
    התגובה של גיל לא באה מאיתנו. מודים לך על השיתוף ומאחלים לך הרבה בריאות והצלחה.

  14. מאת אריאל :

    אכן לאחר קריאה יותר מעמיקה הבנתי שיש גיל ויש גילי.

  15. מאת נגה :

    הסיפור שלכם מדהים. במיוחד מדהימה אותי היכולת שלכם להגן על בתכם. מהתנסות קצרצרה עם תינוק בבית-חולים ברור לי שהפרוש שאתם נותנים להתנהגות הרופאים הוא נכון. וזה מפחיד מאד.

  16. מאת מאיה :

    אני עוקבת כבר זמן רב וקוראת כל מילה, מעריצה ונדהמת מכוחותיכם הנפשיים והפיסיים, מהאומץ להקשיב ללב ולעמוד ממש מול כל העולם..
    כואב מאוד לקראו ולקלוט באיזו מציאות רפואית אנו חיים,
    אבל..הכי מכווץ את הלב לקרוא על הבגידה הנוראית והאכזרית של המשפחה שלכם!
    אני כל כך שמחה שהצלחתם במאבקכם וזכיתם בילדה בריאה (כבר לא יכולה לחכות לפרקים עם הסוף הטוב :) כמה מזל יש לה לילדה הזו- שנולדה דוקא לכם!
    אתם מודל להשראה והתחזקות- יישר כוחכם!

  17. מאת ורד :

    מחכים כבר לפרק הבא
    תהיו בריאים תודה על שאתם חולקים את סיפורכם עימנו!

  18. מאת רונן :

    אני עוקב בהתרגשות אחרי סיפורכם.
    עד לפני מספר שנים גם אני הייתי בטוח שרופאים הם אלילים, או לפחות קוסמים גאונים.

    מאז קרו מספר דברים שגרמו לי להבין שהם בעלי מקצוע כמו כל אחד אחד, עם אינטרסים אנושיים, חומריים.

    גם בלי לדעת את כל הפרטים ובלי לברר באופן אובייקטיבי את הצד השני של התמונה, הסיפור שאתם מציגים
    מאוד מתאים לנסיון שלי עם רופאים.

    אני משוכנע שלא כולם רק תאבי יוקרה ובצע, אבל לפחות רובם רחוקים מאוד מהקדושה שכל כך הרבה
    אנשים נוטים לייחס להם. ברור לי שמעטים, אם בכלל, מייחסים משקל לשבועת הרופא.

    תודה על פירסום הסיפור. זה מאוד מעודד ומחזק את מי שראה את המערכת מזווית דומה לשלכם וחשב
    שהוא די לבד במאבקים שלו, כשהסביבה הקרובה לא תומכת, כי לא יכול להיות שיודעים יותר טוב מרופא
    ולא יכול להיות שיש לרופא כוונה שונה משליחות אלוהית לעזור לכל אדם המגיע אליו.

    המון תודה על ההשראה.

    מאחל לכם את כל האושר בעולם,
    רונן

  19. מאת מרינה :

    בתגובה של רוני טל לפרק "המשפט" כתוב כי מדובר בפרק אופטימי. מצד אחד, אכן יש בו תפנית חיובית בעלילה. מצד שני, אני חושבת עד כמה הפרק הזה פסימי, שכן המשפט הוא משחק מזל ולו היו נופלים לידיו של שופט אחר, יתכן והיו מאבדים את בתם.

  20. מאת שירן :

    לאחרונה רכשתי את הספר,אני חייבת לציין שחווית הקריאה של הספר הייתה טובה בהרבה מהמעקב השבועי אחרי האתר, מהרגע שקיבלתי אותו לא יכולתי להורידו מידיי, הרגשתי איך אני מלווה אתכם לאורך כל הדרך, כשאני הולכת לאיבוד בין הדפים.
    תודה לכם על התושייה שעוררתם בי, למדתי בזכותכם שתמיד יש עוד דרך שאפשר ללכת בה ושתמיד הבחירה היא בידיי

  21. מאת גילי ומירב :

    תודה לכולכם!
    לכל מי שליווה אותנו, לכל מי שקרא והגיב, לכל מי שתמך ופרגן ולכל מי שנתן לסיפור שלנו לגעת בו. הספר מוצע כעת למכירה במהדורת דפוס ערוכה ומסוגננת. ניתן גם לרכוש גרסה דיגיטלית של מהדורת הדפוס תמורת סכום סימלי של 30 ש"ח. אנחנו נמשיך להיות כאן בשביל כל מי שירגיש צורך לפנות אלינו באמצעות המייל או האתר.
    שתהיה לכולנו שנה טובה ובריאה
    גילי ומירב

  22. מאת גילי ומירב :

    שלום לכולם! מי שמעוניין יכול לקרוא כעת את 25 הפרקים הראשונים של הספר דרך האתר. בשבילנו זהו עוד שלב במסע שלנו להביא את הסיפור שלנו אל תוך לבכם. פעמים רבות בדרך נתקלנו בחומות ובתהומות אך בכל מקרה היתה זו דרך מספקת ומלמדת ביותר עבורנו. אנחנו מקווים שנזכה להיות עבורכם כמו טיפות המים המעצבות סימנים בסלע. כל אחד ואחת מכם מוזמנים לראות עצמכם כטיפות נוספת החוברת אלינו להפוך ביחד לגל אחד גדול של מודעות. אנחנו מבקשים מכם לעשות מאמץ כדי לא לטבוע בים הפרטים הקטנים אלא לראות את האמת הגדולה המנסה להתגלות מתוכם.כל טוב! גילי

נושאים: כללי | סגור לתגובות

התגובות אינן מאופשרות.